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Posts Tagged ‘dealerships’

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Car buying can often be a headache and wherever you go there is often a problem with one car or another and depending on the brand and location can sometimes matter between getting a reliable car or a total lemon. But let’s get into that a bit first.. GM and Ford seems to get quite a bit of backlash, Ford; Found on road dead and GM well, we all know their cars can have some problems, especially electrical. But often people will convince themselves that a car brand is junk because a few parts are going bad or usually need replacing on one or more of the vehicles.

Personally i think it’s switching from car to car that is the problem. I have had the same car for 13 years and the car is 16 years old. Still runs like new other than a few upcoming problems mostly due to rust. These are fairly cheap problems and 99% of the time you want to get rid of a car that has engine or transmission problems. Though there are some people that will replace them. It’s pretty cheap if you have the right tools and a replacement engine/transmission. New cars are often plagued with problems ranging from various defects that was overlooked by the quality department. Sometimes though, buying a new car won’t have any issues. This goes into determining whether you should buy used or new. Lots of people buy new cars and don’t run into any problems. 1994 Ford Escort did well for my family and the same for a 2011 Jeep Wrangler. Buying new often starts the slate clean and there is no previous owner other than the dealer.

Next people will argue that Honda (or insert other vehicle brand) is better than any GM or Ford vehicle which is flat out nonsense. https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=million+mile+ford
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=million+mile+chevy

While most of them are trucks or vans which often have bigger engines in (which can make a difference) these vehicles are often owned by companies or those who have a lot of income to drive 2k on the daily basis. For one those vehicles are still basically brand new, most likely well maintained with proper fluid changes and mileage tune ups. They didn’t get time to age. But even with me with a 16 year old car and less than 100k it still functions like it was just bought off the dealer. It all greatly depends on how you use the car and remember that i said a bigger engine means longer lasting. Well a cheap 4 cylinder car chances are it won’t have much horsepower until you floor it. Hondas 4 cylinder engines can be fast cars but chances are you may often be using 3-4 (thousand) RPMs in order to get it moving. My 6 cylinder engine only takes 2-3k RPMs and often times less than 2k with the right air/gas mixture.

So really it doesn’t matter on the brand. It could matter on the year/model because some that have been in production are often plagued with common problems, anywhere from gasket leaks to unintended acceleration these vehicles may be best to be avoided and it may be best to look for a used vehicle in that case. It’s also cheaper to buy used than new because new often means a heavy price tag and once you leave the lot that car is not worth the same when you bought it. Depreciation is one the worst things for a car especially when you bought one for 60k and it’s now only worth 10k. Well maybe closer to 40k but you sort of get the idea that buying new isn’t always a good thing. Of course buying new could ensure you get all the options you are looking for and you don’t have to worry about any maintenance for at least awhile (other than the basic necessities). For the most part anyway buying new does have it’s advantages like you are not having to buy new brakes/rotors for the first several years (or x amount of miles) and the same with new tires. They are already new, everything on the car is brand new so unless a part is defective or broken due to poor manufacturing it’s generally a good idea to be prepared for that but for the most part that money can be saved (if you are not spending most of it on the car loan).

Buying used, well does have it’s own advantages as well, you may have a lower insurance rate, less money to be putting down the car and depending on how used/old it is you may not have any car payments. But with being free of car payments may include car repairs. You also have to be knowledgeable on car mechanics or pay someone to have the car checked out. Chances are the car will leave you on the side of the road even with a check up. It could be that the high mileage on the vehicle caused a part to wear out or maybe the previous person often drove the car until the gas was empty destroying the fuel pump but it still worked the day you bought it but 3 days later it could have finally died. And sometimes these things die suddenly without warning.

I may just prefer to do this…

Buy a car and drive it until you can’t fix it due to parts being unavailable.

Seems counterintuitive because cars depreciate and lose their value over time and people say putting more money into a car than it is worth is not cost effective. Chances are to the average person who just gets into their car to drive to their destination and probably hasn’t seen the inside of an engine because often times we think a car is running well but then there’s transmission problems and you have fluid leaking out of the pan. That is when most people say it’s time to wreck the car at the junkyard. Just look at some youtube videos of people destroying their engine even though there could have been little issue with the engine itself but because the frame is rotting out they think the entire car is useless and needs to be destroyed further than it already is. Actually with some welding experience and a bit of knowledge on how to build car frames it’s quite easy to rebuild a car that has been rotted out beyond repair. All the frame is, is metal. The hard part especially for classic cars is finding an engine for it and i really don’t know that much about car restoration, how much it costs, ect.. other than the frame being metal which is really not that different from iron smiths back in middle ages and could be easy to do with some learning.

Or you could do what some car manuals state and keep the underside clear of salt and other debris that would probably contribute to rusting. Put some anti-rust paint and you should be good but needs to be done properly so moisture doesn’t get trapped behind the paint. Sadly this even happens to newer cars where the paint starts bubbling due to moisture in between the frame and the paint. I wouldn’t know the proper technique but for starters maybe rebuild the car in a non humid climate.

Even if you can no longer find the parts for the car, maybe the car could be used as a project for someone who needs a part or they may have the part you need. Sometimes you can special order parts where manufactures will make the part you require if it’s within their means but it could be costly. The average life a car has according to experts is 11 years. But there are still many that last up to 30 years. It depends mostly on whether the owner(s) are maintaining the car and how long they want to keep it for. The major problem of keeping an older vehicle is outdated safety features and less fuel efficiency. However, i believe that if more people held onto cars there would be a market for putting safety and more fuel efficency into the cars already on the road versus buying a new car. The mindset of buying a new vehicle instead of holding onto the same one makes cars disposable. In Japan cars that are less than 10 years old often gets put into the junkyard possibly due to more strict regulations but something about that seems fishy (it’s been awhile since i looked at the guidelines of owning a car in Japan). But as always to keep the economy going people have to buy a new car to keep the auto industries in business. I look at a car like anything else, it’s a tool that gets you from someplace to another and really the only time i’d buy a new one is if my old one can still be used and not discarded. Or if it absolutely can’t be used.

Even recycling it is costly so keeping it on the road makes me feel like i accomplished something in my life and someday that car would be a relic in a museum somewhere. Of course though if you buy a boring car, it won’t do too much to keep it running forever unless you’re really attached to it. The only way i’d buy one is if i plan on using it for 20-30 years. In which i am in the market for a truck, an F150. I don’t have a truck but i car but will keep the car along with getting the truck to haul stuff around. It can also haul the car around too. But i’m not buying it to replace the car.

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